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Control Through Breeding Methods of Factors Affecting Nutritional Quality of Cereals and Grain Legumes

  • Alessandro Bozzini
  • Vittorio Silano
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 105)

Abstract

The comparison of nutritional quality parameters of proteins from cultivated cereal and legume species with animal proteins indicate the poor nutritional value of these plant products. The nutritive value of different cereal and legume species is very variable and large differences have also been observed coming from cultivars belonging to the same species. Many interpreting factors, such as protein content, essential amino acid composition and availability, protein digestibility and others are involved in such a high variability. In addition, cereals as well as legumes may contain large amounts of antinutritional factors which can have serious effects under particular circumstances (i. e. tannins in a low-protein diet or phytates in a metal-deficient diet). Some legume species also contain chemicals of a different nature (i. e. lathyrogens, cyanogenetic glycosides, and others) which may be extremely toxic when ingested in significant amounts. The plant breeder attempting to develop higher-yielding, disease-resistant and nutritionally-improved crop varieties should be aware of such a complex of factors and alert to the possible production or increse of undesirable products or deleterious changes in chemical composition. Available data, although rather limited, indicate valuable breeding approaches to the improvement of nutritive value of cereal and legume grains for humans.

Keywords

Protein Digestibility Legume Species Legume Seed Limit Amino Acid Antinutritional Factor 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1978

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alessandro Bozzini
    • 1
  • Vittorio Silano
    • 2
  1. 1.Plant Production and Protection Division, FAOCrop and Grassland Production ServiceRomeItaly
  2. 2.Laboratory of ToxicologyIstituto Superiore di SanitaRomeItaly

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