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Phylogenetic Survey of Sensory Functions

  • M. A. Ali
  • R. P. Croll
  • R. Jaeger
Part of the NATO Advanced Study Institutes Series book series (NSSA, volume 18)

Abstract

The information given in this chapter was assembled with the purpose of giving a quick and convenient indication of the distribution of particular sensory functions among the different animal groups. The chapter is meant to complement the survey chapters in this volume which often focus on selected organisms as being illustrative of general mechanisms and which due to considerations of space were not able to give mention to all classes of organisms. For those desiring further information on certain sensory modalities in a class of animals references are given in the tables. The references selected were mostly of a review nature and tended to give the best overview of the general capabilities of the class. Further references to the original research papers are given in these reviews. On occasions when no recent review containing information on the sensory capabilities of class or order could be found, original research articles are referenced in the table. In addition to those sources specifically referenced in the tables the reader should be aware of the excellent reviews of comparative sensory physiology found in Prosser (1973), Bullock and Horridge (1965) and in the various volumes of the Handbook of Sensory Physiology (Springer-Verlag).

Keywords

Olfactory Bulb Sensory Modality Sense Organ Sensory Function Sensory Physiology 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1978

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. A. Ali
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • R. P. Croll
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • R. Jaeger
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.Dépt. Biol.Univ. MontréalMontrealCanada
  2. 2.Dépt. Biol.McGill Univ.MontrealCanada
  3. 3.Dept. Zool.SUNYAlbanyUSA

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