Advertisement

Regional Cerebral Blood Flow in Man During Different Stages of Wakefulness and Sleep

  • J. S. Meyer
  • F. Sakai
  • H. Naritomi

Abstract

Experience has now been gained with over 1300 measurements of regional cerebral blood flow in normal volunteers and in patients with neurological disorders using a modification of the 133Xe inhalation method (1). Since the method is noninvasive, causes minimal discomfort and, in our laboratory, is routinely monitored with simultaneous polygraphic recording of electroencephalogram (EEG), submental electromyography (EMG), extra-ocular movement (EOG), blood pressure (BP), pulse, body temperature, respiration and end-tidal pCO2 and pO2, we have had the opportunity of observing changes in regional blood flow during the relaxed, awake state in quiet darkness, during mild anxiety, during activation and during different stages of spontaneous sleep in normal volunteers and in patients with narcolepsy.

Keywords

Cerebral Blood Flow Normal Volunteer Slow Wave Sleep Regional Cerebral Blood Flow Regional Blood Flow 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Meyer, J.S., Ishihara,N., Deshumkh, V.D. et al. (1977): An improved method for noninvasive measurement of regional cerebral blood flow by 133Xe inhalation. Description of the method and normal values obtained in healthy volunteers. Stroke, in press.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Meyer, J.S. and Toyoda, M. (1971): Studies of rapid changes in cerebral circulation and metabolism during arousal and rapid eye movement sleep in human subjects with cerebrovascular disease. In Zulch K.J. (Ed.): Cerebral Circulation and Stroke. New York, Springer, 156–163.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Obrist, W.D., Thomson, K.H., Jr., Wang, H.S. et al. (1975): Regional cerebral blood flow estimated by 133-Xenon inhalation. Stroke 6: 245–256.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Reivich, M., Isaacs, G., Evans, E. and Kety, S. (1968): The effect of slow wave sleep and REM sleep in regional cerebral blood flow in cats. J. Neurochem.15: 3 01.Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Townsend, R.E., Prinz, P.N. and Obrist, W.D. (1973): Human cerebral blood flow during sleep and waking. J. Appl. Physiol. 35: 5: 620–625.PubMedGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1979

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. S. Meyer
    • 1
  • F. Sakai
    • 1
  • H. Naritomi
    • 1
  1. 1.Baylor-Methodist Center for Cerebrovascular Research and the Department of NeurologyBaylor College of MedicineHoustonUSA

Personalised recommendations