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Neuropsychological Evaluation in Older Persons

  • Diane Klisz

Abstract

“Clinical neuropsychology is concerned with developing knowledge about human brain-behavior relations, and with applying this knowledge to clinical problems” (Davison, 1974, p. 3). Another way to describe clinical neuropsychology would be to call it the study of psychological effects of brain dysfunction (Reitan, 1966; Davison, 1974). Since clinical neuropsychological tests have been found to be valid indices of the status of the brain (Halstead, 1947; Reitan, 1955a; Schreiber, Goldman, Kleinman, Goldfader, and Snow, 1976; Vega and Parsons, 1967), they may be particularly useful in gerontology; many age-related changes in psychological functions have been attributed to the changes that occur in the brain with aging (Wang, Obrist, and Busse, 1974; Welford and Birren, 1965).

Keywords

Neuropsychological Assessment Brain Damage Neuropsychological Test Battery Clinical Neuropsychology Tactual Performance 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1978

Authors and Affiliations

  • Diane Klisz
    • 1
  1. 1.Geriatric Research, Education and Clinical CenterSt. Louis Veterans Administration HospitalUSA

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