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Transport of Short Chain Fatty Acids

  • Michael J. Jackson
Part of the Biomembranes book series (B, volume 4B)

Abstract

The present interest in the mechanisms involved in intestinal transport of short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) derives from the experiments of Smyth and Taylor [1,2] which showed that compounds of this type were transported against gradients of concentration from luminal to serosal sides of rat intestine incubated in vitro. The nutritional significance of SCFA in the metabolic economy of ruminants is well established [3], and the mechanisms involved in the absorption of SCFA from the rumen have been extensively investigated [4, 5]. Significant concentrations of SCFA also occur within the alimentary tract of rodents [6, 7, 8] and the hen [9, 10]. Although evidence for the absorption of endogenous SCFA from the intestines of non-ruminants has been presented [11, 12, 13], and exogenous SCFA are utilized with high efficiency when fed to rats [14, 15], recent studies suggest that the contribution of SCFA to the metabolism of rats may be small [16]. Thus studies of SCFA transport in the intestines of non-ruminants do not have the background of unequivocal nutritional relevance which supports analogous studies in this area, but such studies have provided information concerning several aspects of intestinal epithelial cell function which are of general interest.

Keywords

Weak Acid Bulk Phase Luminal Side Serosal Side Luminal Fluid 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1974

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael J. Jackson
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PhysiologyGeorge Washington University Medical CenterUSA

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