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Biomembranes pp 283-288 | Cite as

Enzymes of Bacterial Cell Wall Synthesis as Components of the Cell Membrane

  • Jack L. Strominger
  • Heinrich Sandermann
  • Walter Staudenbauer
  • Jay Umbreit
  • Rachel Goldman

Abstract

Bacterial cell walls are synthesized in part through a complex reaction cycle which occurs in the membrane of the cell (1). The intracellular precursors of the peptidoglycan (UDP-acetylmuramylpentapeptide, UDP-acetylglucosamine and other substances) are utilized in this process to form a repeating disaccharide-peptide unit of the cell wall (which is to some extent genus specific). This unit is then added to a growing peptidoglycan chain at the outside of the cell membrane. A lipid in the cell membrane, identified as a C55isoprenyl phosphate, functions as the membrane carrier for the hydrophilic activated disaccharide-peptide unit, transferring it to the site of its utilization at the outside of the membrane. Many of the enzymes which catalyze the formation of this repeating disaccharide-peptide unit of the peptidoglycan are membrane bound proteins. Thus, the study of these proteins may yield a great deal of information in general about the nature of enzymes which are localized in the cell membrane. The purpose of this presentation is to describe several such membrane proteins which have been obtained from different microorganisms.

Keywords

Cell Wall Synthesis Extent Genus Lactam Antibiotic Normal Amino Acid Membrane Carrier 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1971

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jack L. Strominger
    • 1
  • Heinrich Sandermann
    • 1
  • Walter Staudenbauer
    • 1
  • Jay Umbreit
    • 1
  • Rachel Goldman
    • 1
  1. 1.Biological LaboratoriesHarvard UniversityCambridgeUSA

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