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The Analysis of Glasses, Refractories, Ceramics, and Related Materials by Atomic Spectroscopy

  • W. M. Wise
  • J. P. Williams
Part of the Progress in Analytical Chemistry book series (PAC)

Abstract

The analysis of glasses and refractory oxides has been simplified in recent years through the development of atomic absorption and emission spectrometers that have improved nebulizers, burners, and electronics. When these features are used in conjunction with the conventional excitation flames, readouts are sufficiently stable to allow the determination of some major constituents, viz., Si (1–11), alkalies (3,5–8,11–13), alkaline earths (3,5,7,8,10,11), and Al (3,5,7–11,14–16). The precision and accuracy are equal to those obtained by gravimetric and titrimetric methods. The resulting spectrometric procedures are usually faster than their more classical counterparts because arduous separations which also tend to increase blanks are no longer necessary prior to the introduction of the sample solution into the excitation source and its comparison with appropriate standards. Consequently, the major problems are now associated with adequate sample preparation and decomposition plus obviating spectral, physical, and chemical interferences. Some of these interferences can be eliminated through the use of chemical releasing agents and/or ionization suppressants (17,18), or high temperature argon plasmas (19–21); the latter being especially useful for the very refractory elements.

Keywords

Excitation Source Atomic Spectroscopy Atomization Temperature Refractory Oxide Flame Emission 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1976

Authors and Affiliations

  • W. M. Wise
    • 1
  • J. P. Williams
    • 1
  1. 1.Research and Development LaboratoriesCorning Glass WorksCorningUSA

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