Trace Metal Analysis in Clinical Chemistry

  • Douglas G. Mitchell
Part of the Progress in Analytical Chemistry book series (PAC)


Trace metals are attracting considerable attention in the biological sciences. Metals such as lead, cadmium, mercury and arsenic are toxic if absorbed in moderate amounts, and they may even be deleterious to health at the background levels found in relatively polluted urban and industrial areas. Other metals such as iron, chromium and zinc are essential nutrients, and there is evidence that a significant proportion of the U.S. population is ingesting less than optimum amounts of these metals.


Isobutyl Ketone Trace Metal Analysis Flameless Atomic Absorption Methyl Isobutyl Ketone Acetylene Flame 


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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1976

Authors and Affiliations

  • Douglas G. Mitchell
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of Laboratories & ResearchNew York State Department of HealthAlbanyUSA

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