Advertisement

Analysis of Metals and Alloys for Major Constituents and Trace Elements by Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy

  • J. Y. Marks
  • G. G. Welcher
  • R. J. Spellman
Part of the Progress in Analytical Chemistry book series (PAC)

Abstract

Atomic absorption spectroscopy has proven to be one of the most versatile measurement tools available to the analytical chemist for the characterization of metals and complex alloys for both major constituents and trace elements. Modern instrumentation with digital electronic readout systems and stable, intense light sources has improved the precision of measurements significantly. Sensitivity for most elements used in metallurgical applications is adequate for a precise direct determination; however, for some of the refractory elements preconcentration may be necessary. Most metals and alloys are readily dissolved in common reagent acids or acid mixtures. Standards are then conveniently prepared from stock solutions of the pure elements. Standards should be carefully matched with samples with respect to both cation and anion concentrations to reduce the possibility of interference effects.

Keywords

Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy Atomization Temperature Complex Alloy Lead Chloride Heating Program 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    J.Y. Marks and G.G. Welcher, Anal. Chem., 142, 1033 (1970).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    J.A. Dean and T.C. Rains, “Flame Emission and Atomic Absorption Spectrometry,” Vol. 3, Marcel Dekker, Inc., New York, N. Y. (1975).Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    J.Y. Marks, R.J. Spellman and B. Wysocki, “Effect of Non-Analyte Light Attenuation on Accuracy in Trace Element Analysis in Complex Alloys,” FACSS 2nd National Meeting, Indianapolis, Ind., Oct., 1975.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    G.G. Welcher, O.H. Kriege and J.Y. Marks, Anal. Chem., 46 1227 (1974).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    J.Y. Marks and G.G. Welcher, “Determination of Trace Elements of Metallurgical Interest in Complex Matrices by Non-Flame Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy,” ASTM E-3 Symposium on Flameless and Cold Vapor Atomic Absorption, Montreal, Canada, June, 1975.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1976

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. Y. Marks
    • 1
  • G. G. Welcher
    • 1
  • R. J. Spellman
    • 1
  1. 1.Pratt and Whitney AircraftMaterials Engineering and Research LaboratoryEast HartfordUSA

Personalised recommendations