Advertisement

Atomic Absorption in Food Analysis — Special Techniques for Traces of Heavy Metals

  • Walter Holak
Part of the Progress in Analytical Chemistry book series (PAC)

Abstract

Atomic absorption spectrophotometry (AAS) provides one of the most useful and convenient means for the determination of metallic elements in solution from a wide variety of sample types. The basic requirement is that the element of interest be solubilized either in aqueous or certain organic solvents for subsequent aspiration into the flame, whereby the atomic absorption (AA) signal is measured. This general sampling technique is perfectly adequate for most applications down to the parts per million level. At the sub parts per million level some form of sample preconcentration and clean-up may be necessary. This is usually accomplished by chelation and extraction into an organic solvent.

Keywords

Atomic Absorption Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometry Food Analysis Methyl Isobutyl Ketone Condensed Milk 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    W. R. Hatch, and W. L. Ott, “Determination of Sub-Microgram Quantities of Mercury by Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometry,” Anal. Chem., 40 (14) 2085–2087 (1968).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Changes in Methods,“ J-AOAC 54 (2), pp. 466–467 (1971).Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    R. K. Munns, and D. C. Holland, “Determination of Mercury in Fish by Flameless Atomic Absorption: A Collaborative Study,” J-AOAC, 54 (1) 202–205 (1971).Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    B. Bernas, “A New Method for Decomposition and Comprehensive Analysis of Silicates by Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometry,” Anal. Chem., 40 (11) 1682–1686 (1968).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    W. Holak, B. Krinitz, and J. C. Williams, “Simple Rapid Digestion Technique for the Determination of Mercury in Fish by Flameless Atomic Absorption,” J-AOAC, 55 (4) 741–742 (1972).Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    B. Krinitz, and W. Holak, “Simple, Rapid Digestion Technique for the Determination of Mercury in Seafood by Flameless Atomic Absorption: A Collaborative Study,” J-AOAC, 57 (3).Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    W. Iiuan, “Gas Sampling iccd,iiiyuc for Arsenic Determination by Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometry.” Anal. Chem., 41, (12) 1712–1713 (1969).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    D. C. Manning, “A High Sensitivity Arsenic-Selenium Sampling System for Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy,” P. E. Atomic Absorption Newsletter, 10 (6) 123–124 (1971) .Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    H. Folger, J. V. Kratz, C. Herrmann, “Rapid Volatilization of Arsenic, Selenium, Antimony, and Tellurium in Form of Their Hydrides,” Radiochem. and Radioanalyt. Letters, 1 (3), 185–190 (1969).Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    R. W. Moshier, and R. E. Silvers, Gas Chromatography of Metal Chelates, Pergamon Press, N. J. (1965), 1st Ed.Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    B. W. Bailey, and Fa-Chun Lo, “Direct Volatilization of Inorganic Chelates as a Method of Sample Introduction in Atomic Absorption Spectrometry,” Anal. Chem., 44 (7) 1304–1306 (1972).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. 12.
    W. G. Scribner, W. J. Treat, J. D. Weiss and R. W. Moshier, “Solvent Extraction of Metal Ions with Trifluoroacetylacetone,” Anal. Chem., 37 (9) 1136–1142 (1965).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. 13.
    W. Holak, “Determination of Traces of Lead and Cadmium in Foods by Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometry Using the ‘Sampling Boat,’” P. E. Atomic Absorption Newsletter, 12 (3) 63–65 (1973).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1974

Authors and Affiliations

  • Walter Holak
    • 1
  1. 1.FDA-DHEWBrooklynUSA

Personalised recommendations