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The Use of Calculated X-Ray Powder Patterns in the Interpretation of Quantitative Analysis

  • C. Clark
  • D. K. Smith
  • G. G. JohnsonJr.
Part of the Progress in Analytical Chemistry book series (PAC, volume 176)

Abstract

The calculated powder diffraction patterns of well characterized substances are being computed for inclusion in the Powder Diffraction File. The intensities reported in these patterns include relative integrated and peak height intensities which are simulated using computer programs allowing for various aberrations, geometric conditions, and resolutions. A scaling factor is reported with these patterns which allows for the conversion of these intensities to an absolute scale for application in quantitative analysis. By absolute scaling all patterns or by using a basis of I/Iα-Al203 quantitative interpretation of experimental patterns is permitted.

Keywords

Powder Pattern Powder Diffraction File Niobium Oxide Quantitative Phase Analysis Calculated Pattern 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1973

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. Clark
    • 1
  • D. K. Smith
    • 1
  • G. G. JohnsonJr.
    • 1
  1. 1.Dept. of GeosciencesPennsylvania State Univ.University ParkUSA

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