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Adoptive Immunotherapy of Spontaneous Leukemia-Lymphoma in AKR Mice

  • M. M. Bortin
  • R. L. Truitt
  • W. C. Rose
  • A. A. Rimm
  • E. C. Saltzstein
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 73B)

Abstract

Barnes, et al, (3) first proposed that the transplantation of allogeneic bone marrow might serve as an aggressive antileukemic treatment. They reasoned that following lethal irradiation, residual leukemia cells might be eliminated through a “reaction of immunity” carried out by the transplanted cells. Mathé proposed the term adoptive immunotherapy to describe this effect (10). New insights in immunobiology have caused a resurgence of interest in immunotherapy as an adjunct to currently available therapy of cancer. Many reasons exist which make it difficult to manipulate a patient’s own immune system so that it can become decisively effective against his own tumor. Transplantation of immunocompetent cells from a normal individual to the tumor-bearing patient offers an alternative immunotherapeutic approach. Unfortunately, transplanted immunocompetent cells also recognize and react against histocompatibility antigens present on the normal tissues of the host, causing potentially lethal graft-versus-host (GVH) disease, the major complication of adoptive immunotherapy.

Keywords

Untreated Mouse Immunocompetent Cell Adoptive Immunotherapy Rescue Control Mount Sinai Medical 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1976

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. M. Bortin
    • 1
    • 2
  • R. L. Truitt
    • 1
    • 2
  • W. C. Rose
    • 1
    • 2
  • A. A. Rimm
    • 1
    • 2
  • E. C. Saltzstein
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Mount Sinai Medical CenterMilwaukeeUSA
  2. 2.Medical College of WisconsinMilwaukeeUSA

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