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Oxygen Exchanges between Blood and Resting Skeletal Muscle: A Shunt-Sink Hypothesis

  • P. Grieb
  • P. C. Pape
  • R. E. Forster
  • C. W. Goodwin
  • S. Nioka
  • L. Labbatte
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 191)

Abstract

Prevously we have reported the use of oxygen-18 isotope and double indicator dilution methodology to measure the exchanges of eoxygen between blood and brain tissues (Grieb et al., 1983). In the present experiments we used the same technique for the study of a canine hind limb preparation. To our knowledge, oxygen isotopes have not been used to study the features of oxygen delivery to muscles, with the exception of preliminary studies of Forster, el al. (1976) and Rose and Goreski (1982). More is known about the distribution of inert diffusible tracers in muscle preparations; (eg. Aukland and Leraand, 1960; Paradise et al., 1971; Piiper and Meyer, in press; Sparks and Mohrman, 1977; Tonnesen and Sjersen, 1967), and such data are sometimes extrapolated to oxygen.

Keywords

Slow Component Venous Outflow Dilution Curve Tritiated Water Double Circulation 
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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. Grieb
    • 1
  • P. C. Pape
    • 1
  • R. E. Forster
    • 1
  • C. W. Goodwin
    • 1
  • S. Nioka
    • 1
  • L. Labbatte
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PhysiologyUniversity of PennsylvaniaPhiladelphiaUSA

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