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Variability of Intercapillary Distance Estimated on Histological Sections of Rat Heart

  • L. Hoofd
  • Z. Turek
  • K. Kubat
  • B. E. M. Ringnalda
  • S. Kazda
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 191)

Abstract

The majority of models of O2 supply to myocardial tissue are based on the classical model of Krogh (1919). This model requires the radius of the tissue cylinder as one of the crucial input data. Usually, only its mean value has been considered, as derived on histological sections from the number of capillaries per mm2. However, for a realistic description, the full distribution of the radii of the tissue cylinders has to be taken into account. Recently this distribution was shown to be approximately log-normal (Renkin et al., 1981; Turek and Rakusan, 1981), and thus to be fully defined by median radius and logarithmic standard deviation (log SD), the latter serving as an index of the variability.

Keywords

Domain Method Heterogeneity Index Spontaneous Hypertension Tissue Cylinder Capillary Spacing 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • L. Hoofd
    • 1
  • Z. Turek
    • 1
  • K. Kubat
    • 2
  • B. E. M. Ringnalda
    • 1
  • S. Kazda
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of PhysiologyUniversity of NijmegenThe Netherlands
  2. 2.Department of Pathol. AnatomyUniversity of NijmegenNijmegenThe Netherlands
  3. 3.Institute of PharmacologyBayer AG.WuppertalGermany

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