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In Situ NADH Laser Fluorimetry and Its Application to the Study of Cardiac Metabolism

  • Guy Renault
  • Elisabeth Raynal
  • Martine Sinet
  • Martine Muffat-Joly
  • Jean Cornillault
  • Jean-Jacques Pocidalo
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 191)

Abstract

The in vivo fluorimetry of NADH has proven to be a very efficient method for non-destructive investigation of organ metabolism. First defined by Chance and his group(1) this method u/as subsequently extended to numerous experimental models and provided important information on challenging topics, such as the importance of the border zone in myocardial infarction.

Keywords

Cardiac Metabolism Organ Metabolism Reference Light Ischemia Test Anoxia Period 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • Guy Renault
    • 1
  • Elisabeth Raynal
    • 1
  • Martine Sinet
    • 1
  • Martine Muffat-Joly
    • 1
  • Jean Cornillault
    • 2
  • Jean-Jacques Pocidalo
    • 1
  1. 1.INSERM U13 Hopital Claude BernardParisFrance
  2. 2.Cilas-AlcatelMarcoussisFrance

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