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Oxygen Consumption and Convective Transport during Cardiopulmonary Bypass

  • R. E. Safford
  • J. D. Whiffen
  • E. N. Lightfoot
  • R. S. Tepper
  • J. H. G. Rankin
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 37 A)

Abstract

Described here are the progressive changes in blood-flow distribution that accompany four-hour heart-lung bypass in dogs and the effects of perfusion rate on flow distribution and oxygen consumption. The corresponding changes produced by anesthesia alone and by the thoracotomy needed for a bypass procedure are also shown for comparison purposes. These data indicate that the bypass procedure itself puts a very significant stress on the test animals and that perfusion rates in excess of resting cardiac output are required to prevent hypoxia induced irreversible tissue damage.

Keywords

Cardiac Output Perfusion Rate Bypass Procedure Left Subclavian Artery Colloidal Osmotic Pressure 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. 1.
    Safford, R. E., The Perfusion Rate in Heart-Lung Bypass, Ph.D. Thesis, University of Wisconsin, Madison, USA, 1973.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Siggaard-Andersen, O., The Acid-Base Status of the Blood, 2nd ed., Williams and Wilkens, Baltimore, 1964.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Crowell, J. W. and E. E. Smith, Oxygen Deficit and Irreversible Shock, Amer. J. Physiol., 206, 313, 1964.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Kelman, G. R., Digital Computer Subroutine for the Conversion of Oxygen Tension into Saturation, J. Appl. Physiol., 21, 4, 1966.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1973

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. E. Safford
    • 1
  • J. D. Whiffen
    • 1
  • E. N. Lightfoot
    • 1
  • R. S. Tepper
    • 1
  • J. H. G. Rankin
    • 1
  1. 1.Departments of Chemical Engineering, Surgery, Physiology, and Gynecology and ObstetricsUniversity of WisconsinMadisonUSA

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