Advertisement

Oxygen Transport Changes after Transfusion with Stored Blood in a Hemorrhagic Canine Model

  • C. E. Shields
  • M. G. Burns
  • A. Zegna
  • D. Meixner
  • J. Bratton
  • D. Brooks
  • L. O’Malley
  • G. Phillips
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 37 A)

Abstract

Transfusion therapy has the dual purpose of providing volume to replace shed blood and to provide red cells to replace the oxygen transport function.1 Storage with the present collection solution, acid-citrate-dextrose (ACD), has been limited to 21 days because the red cell is undergoing continual deterioration during storage, with loss of many of its functions. One in particular, red cell oxygen transport as measured by the oxygen dissociation curve, decreased significantly. The intimate role of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (2,3-DPG) with the oxygen function appeared involved, since the DPG level also decreased with storage. The clinical effect of these storage changes was reflected in the finding of lowered p50 values in the recipient after transfusion of the stored blood.2–5

Keywords

Mean Arterial Pressure Oxygen Transport Transfusion Therapy Shock Period Oxygen Dissociation Curve 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Bibliography

  1. 1.
    Strumia, M. M., W. H. Crosby, J. G. Gibson, T. J. Greenwalt, and J. R. Krevans. General Principles of Blood Transfusion. Philadelphia: J. B. Lippincott Co., 1963.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Valeri, C. R., and N. M. Hirsch. Restoration in vivo of erythrocyte adenosine triphosphate, 2,3-diphosphoglycerate, potassium ion, and sodium ion concentrations following the transfusion of acid-citrate-dextrose stored human red blood cells. J. Lab. Clin. Med. 73: 722, 1969.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Finch, C. A., and C. Lenfant. Oxygen transport in man. New Eng. J. Med. 286: 407, 1972.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    McConn, R., and L. R. M. Del Guercio. Respiratory function of blood in the acutely ill patient and the effect of steroids. Ann. Surg. 174: 436, 1971.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Valtis, D. J., and A. C. Kennedy: Defective gas-transport function of stored red blood cells. Lancet 1: 119, 1954.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    de Verdier, C. H., L. Garby, M. Hjelm, and C. Hagman. Adenine in blood preservation: Posttransfusion viability and biochemical changes. Transfusion 4: 331, 1964.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Shields, C. E. Comparison studies of whole blood stored in ACD and CPD and with adenine. Transfusion 8: 1, 1968.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Hill, A. V. Possible effects of the aggregation molecules on its dissociation curves. J. Physiol. (London) 40: IV, 1910.Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    Severinghaus, J. W. Blood gas calculator. J. Appl. Physiol. 21: 1108, 1966.Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    Powell, J. B., C. E. Emery, and G. A. Peyton. An automated procedure for the assay of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate by measuring the inorganic phosphorus released. Clin. Chem. 18: 241.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1973

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. E. Shields
    • 1
  • M. G. Burns
    • 1
  • A. Zegna
    • 1
  • D. Meixner
    • 1
  • J. Bratton
    • 1
  • D. Brooks
    • 1
  • L. O’Malley
    • 1
  • G. Phillips
    • 1
  1. 1.USA Medical Research LaboratoryFort KnoxUSA

Personalised recommendations