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Regional Heterogeneity of PCO2 and PO2 in Skeletal Muscle

  • Hugh D. Van Liew
  • B. Rodgers
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 37 A)

Abstract

Gas pockets in the peritoneal space and subcutaneous tissue have been used for estimation of oxygen and carbon dioxide partial pressures in tissue (Campbell, 1931; Van Liew, 1968). Inside of soft tissue it is difficult to form and later retrieve a gas bubble, so a special technique was devised whereby gas is retained inside a piece of hollow glass capillary tubing (Van Liew, 1962). Gasometric techniques have the major advantage that both PCO2 and PO2 are measured simultaneously.

Keywords

Oxygen Transport Carbon Dioxide Partial Pressure Peritoneal Space Oxygen Absorber PC02 Approach 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. CAMPBELL, J. A. (1931). Gas tensions in the tissues. Physiol. Rev. 11: 1–40.Google Scholar
  2. KUNZE, K. (1968). Normal and critical oxygen supply to the muscle. In Oxygen Transport in Blood and Tissue., edited by D.-W. Libbers, U. C. Luft, G. Thews, and E. Witzleb. Stuttgart, Georg Thieme Verlag, pp. 198–208.Google Scholar
  3. VAN LIEW, H. D. (1962). Tissue gas tensions by microtonometry; results in liver and fat. J. Appl. Physiol. 17: 359–363.Google Scholar
  4. VAN LIEW, H. D. (1968). Oxygen and carbon dioxide tensions in tissue and blood of normal and acidotic rats. J. Appl. Physiol. 25: 575–580.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  5. WHALEN, W. J., and P. NAIR (1970). Skeletal muscle P02: effect of of inhaled and topically applied 02 and CO2. Amer. J. Physiol. 218: 973–980.PubMedGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1973

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hugh D. Van Liew
    • 1
  • B. Rodgers
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Physiology, School of MedicineState Univ. of N.Y. at BuffaloBuffaloUSA

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