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Regulatory Dysfunction of Microvasculature and Catecholamine Metabolism in Spinal Cord Injury

  • N. Eric Naftchi
  • Edward W. Lowman
  • Maurice Berard
  • G. Heiner Sell
  • Theobald Reich
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 37 A)

Abstract

Since 1917 when Head and Riddoch (4) first described autonomic hyperreflexia in spinal cord injury, its attending neurophysiological symptoms have been well documented by other investigators. It is well known that the triggering mechanism may well be any noxious stimuli but most often autonomic hyperreflexia is caused by hyperirritability of the bladder due to formation of stones of calcium salts or infection of the urinary bladder; the common denominator being distension of the vesicular wall leading to increased intracystic pressure. The major symptoms during the so-called hyperreflexia are: pallor of the skin below in contrast to a histamine-like flush above the level of the lesion, vasodilatation in the head and neck accompanied by engorging pulsating corotid arteries. Moreover, the peak of hyperreflexia coincides with the height of intracystic and brachial blood pressures, headache, and piloerection. Guttmann and Whitteridge (3) were the first to observe that the hypertensive crises could be produced only in those subjects with lesions above the sixth thoracic dermatome (T6). The purpose of this communication is to shed more light on the etiology of these hypertensive episodes which occur spontaneously in human subjects with high level spinal cord injury and which are frequently the cause of cerebrovascular accidents.

Keywords

Spinal Cord Injury Brachial Blood Pressure Venous Occlusion Plethysmography Fourth Finger Hypertensive Episode 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1973

Authors and Affiliations

  • N. Eric Naftchi
    • 1
  • Edward W. Lowman
    • 1
  • Maurice Berard
    • 1
  • G. Heiner Sell
    • 1
  • Theobald Reich
    • 1
  1. 1.Laboratory of Biochemical Pharmacology, Institute of Rehabilitation MedicineNew York University Medical CenterNew YorkUSA

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