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Autoregulation of Oxygen Supply to Brain Tissue (Introductory Paper)

  • Haim I. Bicher
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 37 A)

Abstract

The availability of oxygen throughout the brain is far from homogeneous, oxygen tensions varying 30 or 40 mm Hg within a distance of a few microns (1–4). However, the pO2 at a given micro-area of cerebral tissue is remarkably constant, and can be changed only through major alterations in blood supply or the composition of respiratory gases (1,4,10). We have defined the different processes arrived at maintaining the constant brain cell oxygen micro-environment as “oxygen autoregulatory mechanisms.”

Keywords

Oxygen Transport Hyperbaric Oxygen Arterial Blood Flow Tissue Oxygen Tension Hyperbaric Chamber 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1973

Authors and Affiliations

  • Haim I. Bicher
    • 1
  1. 1.Departments of Anatomy and MedicineMedical University of South CarolinaCharlestonUSA

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