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In Vitro Investigations on the Influence of Antirheumatic Drugs on Purine Phosphoribosyltransferases and Their Possible Clinical Consequence

  • G. Partsch
  • I. Sandtner
  • G. Tausch
  • R. Eberl
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 76B)

Abstract

According to the chronic course of rheumatic diseases drug therapy is necessary for a long time. Because of the great variability of diseases which are summarized under the term “rheumatic diseases” different drugs have been developed. Most of them have analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects. Today these pharmaceuticals will be divided into nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory compounds, corticosteroids, drugs for chrysotherapy, anti-malarial drugs, anti-gout drugs and for special cases of septic arthritis antibiotics. The term antirheumatic is used in a general sense and indicates that the drug has a good effect in the treatment of human rheumatic disease, but its precise action is not completely clear. On the other hand, there is evidence of a lot of side effects being caused by the application of antirheumatic drugs (Mathies, 1). Most of the side effects have a clinical background, whereas biochemical effects are not usually seen. We therefore tested some antirheumatic drugs for their influence on the purine-phosphoribosyltransferases.

Keywords

Uric Acid Rheumatic Disease Human Erythrocyte Human Lymphocyte Uric Acid Level 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1977

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. Partsch
    • 1
  • I. Sandtner
    • 1
  • G. Tausch
    • 1
  • R. Eberl
    • 1
  1. 1.Ludwig Boltzmann-Institute for Rheumatology and BalneologyViennaAustria

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