Advertisement

Tubular Handling of Allantoin in the Rat Kidney

  • R. A. Kramp
  • F. Diézi-Chométy
  • R. Lenoir
  • F. Roch-Ramel
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 76B)

Abstract

Allantoin is the end product of purine metabolism in lower mammals, which, in contrast, to man and apes possess uricase activity. In 1948, Friedman and Byers (I) measured the urinary clearance of allantoin in the dog and the rat. They found that the clearance of allantoin and creatinine were similar and therefore proposed the use of allantoin as a glomerular marker. More recently, Yü and coll. (2) demonstrated reabsorption of allantoin in mongrel and Dalmatian dogs under non-diuretic conditions. The clearance of allantoin, however, approached that of inulin when the rate of urine flow was increased. Conversely, Greger, Lang and Deetjen (3) could not find evidence for tubular transports of allantoin in the rat kidney.

Keywords

Urine Flow Distal Tubule Purine Metabolism Tubular Fluid Peritubular Capillary 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Friedman M. and Byers J.O. — Clearance of allantoin in the rat and dog as a measure of glomerular filtrate rates. Amer. J. Physiol. 151: 192, 1948.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Yü T.S., Gutman A.B., Berger L. and Kaung C. — Low uricase activity in the Dalmatian dog simulated in mongrels given oxonic acid. Amer. J. Physiol. 220: 973, 1971.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Greger R., Lang F. and Deetjen P. — Handling of allantoin by the rat kidney. Clearance and micropuncture data. Pflügers Arch. 357: 201, 1975.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Chinard F.P. and Enns T.. — Relative renal excretion patterns of sodium ion chloride, ion urea, water and glomerular substances. Amer. J. Physiol. 182:247, 1955PubMedGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Kramp R.A., Lassiter W.E. and Gottschalk C.W.. — Urate-2–14 C transport in the rat nephron. J. Clin. Invest. 50: 35, 1971.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Roch-Ramel F. and Weiner I.M. — Inhibition of urate excretion by pyrazinoate, a micropuncture study. Amer. J. Physiol. 229: 1604, 1975.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Kramp R.A. and Lenoir R.. — Distal permeability to urate and effects of benzofuran derivatives in the rat kidney. Amer. J. Physiol. 228: 875, 1975.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Roch-Ramel F., F. Chométy and G. Peters . — Urea concentrations in tubular fluid and in renal tissue of non-diuretic rats. Amer. J. Physiol. 215: 429, 1968.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    Kramp R.A. and Lenoir R. — Characteristics of urate influx in the rat nephron. Amer. J. Physiol. 229: 1654, 1975.PubMedGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1977

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. A. Kramp
    • 1
    • 2
  • F. Diézi-Chométy
    • 1
    • 2
  • R. Lenoir
    • 1
    • 2
  • F. Roch-Ramel
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Medicine, School of MedicineUniversity of LouvainLouvainBelgium
  2. 2.Institut de pharmacologiel’Université de LausanneLausanneSwitzerland

Personalised recommendations