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The Relationship between Membrane Fatty Acids and the Development of the Rat Retina

  • Robert E. Anderson
  • R. M. Benolken
  • Margaret B. Jackson
  • Maureen B. Maude
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 83)

Abstract

The vertebrate rod visual cell is anatomically divided into two compartments, the inner segment and the outer segment (Fig. 1). The rod inner segment contains the cellular organelles responsible for most, if not all, of the biosynthetic activity of the cell. One end of the inner segment makes synaptic contact with horizontal and bipolar cells, while the other is connected to the rod outer segments (ROS) via a short connecting cilium. The ROS are made up of hundreds of membraneous discs. Each is free-floating and apparently does not contact other discs or the plasma membrane.

Keywords

Short Chain Fatty Acid Phosphatidyl Choline Essential Fatty Acid Deficiency Retina Development Fatty Acid Supplement 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1977

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert E. Anderson
    • 1
  • R. M. Benolken
    • 1
  • Margaret B. Jackson
    • 2
  • Maureen B. Maude
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Sensory SciencesUniversity of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical SciencesHoustonUSA
  2. 2.Department of OphthalmologyBaylor College of MedicineHoustonUSA

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