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Metabolic Studies on Ethanolamine Phosphoglycerides in Neuronal and Glial Cells

  • H. Woelk
  • G. Porcellati
  • L. Binaglia
  • G. Goracci
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 83)

Abstract

Marked differences in phospholipid metabolism have been observed between glial and neuronal cell enriched fractions. Recently, evidence was obtained for a faster turnover of glycerophospholipids in neurons than in glial cells, since neurons contained a considerably higher phospholipase A1 and A2 activity when compared to the glial cell enriched fraction (Woelk et al., 1973). Furthermore the neuronal cell bodies were found to possess a much higher rate of exchange of both serine and ethanolamine into the phospholipids than the glial cell enriched fraction (Goracci et al., 1973) and Freysz et al., (1969), showed in their extensive investigation on the kinetics of the biosynthesis of phospholipids in neurons and glial cells, isolated from rat brain cortex, that neuronal phospholipids had a faster turnover than glial phospholipids. Recent results, presented by Woelk et al. (1974), indicated that phosphatidylinositol and phosphatidylcholine had the fastest and ethanolamine plasmalogen the slowest turnover in both cell populations.

Keywords

Glial Cell Neuronal Cell Body Fast Turnover Preputial Gland Diacyl Glycerol 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1977

Authors and Affiliations

  • H. Woelk
    • 1
    • 2
  • G. Porcellati
    • 1
    • 2
  • L. Binaglia
    • 1
    • 2
  • G. Goracci
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Einheit für NeurochemieUniversitäts-NervenklinikErlangen-NürnbergWest Germany
  2. 2.Department of BiochemistryUniversity of PerugiaItaly

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