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Monitoring of PO2 in Human Blood

  • H. P. Kimmich
  • F. Kreuzer
  • J. G. Spaan
  • K. Jank
  • J. de Hemptinne
  • M. Demeester
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 75)

Abstract

The surveillance of arterial PO2 in patients with pulmonary or cardiac failure by frequent sampling of blood has several obvious disadvantages. Alternatively the continuous monitoring of PaO2 by use of catheter electrodes still poses numerous problems. However, from a continuous signal of a transducer able to follow variations in PaO2 with respiration and heart activity, more useful information is gained. Under certain circumstances, as well as by studying the evolution of PaO2 during controlled changes of inspired oxygen supply, continuous PO2 monitoring can also be used as a diagnostic tool (e.g. for the detection of pathological shunts).

Keywords

Radial Artery Transient Response Heart Activity Lingual Artery Catheter Electrode 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1976

Authors and Affiliations

  • H. P. Kimmich
    • 1
    • 2
  • F. Kreuzer
    • 1
    • 2
  • J. G. Spaan
    • 1
    • 2
  • K. Jank
    • 1
    • 2
  • J. de Hemptinne
    • 1
    • 2
  • M. Demeester
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.University of NijmegenNijmegenThe Netherlands
  2. 2.University of BrusselsBrusselsBelgium

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