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Autonomic and Pharmacological Control of Oxygen Autoregulation Mechanisms in Brain Tissue

  • H. I. Bicher
  • P. Marvin
  • D. Hunt
  • D. F. Bruley
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 75)

Abstract

In previous publications (1,3) we have described a precisely controlled autoregulatory mechanism to maintain a constant brain TpO2 level. This includes a theoretical “tissue oxygen sensor” able to simultaneously regulate cerebral blood flow and tissue O2 consumption through reflex inhibition-excitation of generalized neuronal activity; it is defined by four criteria in the physiological compensatory response elicited by a short period of anoxic anoxia: 1) short “reoxygenation time” (RT, the time required for TpO2 to return to the pre-anoxic level), 2) increase in cerebral blood flow, 3) presence of an “overshoot” (period after reoxygenation during which TpO2 is higher than baseline, and 4) a period of “anoxic silence” in neuronal activity.

Keywords

Cerebral Blood Flow Brain Oxygen Brain Tissue Oxygenation Carotid Blood Flow TpO2 Level 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. 1.
    Bicher, H.I. Brain autoregulation: A protective reflex to hypoxia. Microvascular Research, 8:291–313, 1974.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Bicher, H.I., Bruley, D.F., Reneau, D.D. and Knisely, M.H. Effect of microcirculation changes on brain tissue oxygenation. J. Physiol., 217:689–707, 1971.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Bicher, H.I. Reneau, D.D., Bruley, D.F. and Knisely, M.H. Brain oxygen supply and neuronal activity under normal and hypoglycemic conditions. Am. J. Physiol., 224: 275–282, 1973.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Bicher, H.I., Reneau, D.D., and Knisely, M.H. Brain tissue oxygenation as determined with a new ultramicro oxygen electrode. In: Blood Oxygenation, (D. Hershey, ed.). pp. 201–207, Plenum Press, New York, 1970.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Bicher, H.I., Rubin, J.W. and Adams, R.J. Clinical use of a new intra-arterial catheter electrode system. In: Oxygen Transport to Tissue: Instrumentation, Methods, and Physiology. (H.I. Bicher, and D.F. Bruley, eds.), pp. 107–113, Plenum Press, New York, 1973.Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Bicher, H.I. and Knisely, M.H. Brain tissue reoxygenation, demonstrated with a new ultramicro oxygen electrode. J. AppL. Physiol., 28:387–390, 1970.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Lubbers, D.W. Personal communication.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1976

Authors and Affiliations

  • H. I. Bicher
    • 1
  • P. Marvin
    • 1
  • D. Hunt
    • 1
  • D. F. Bruley
    • 2
  1. 1.Dept. Pharmacol.Univ. Ark. Med. CenterLittle RockUSA
  2. 2.Dept. Chem. Engin.Tulane Univ.New OrleansUSA

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