The Uptake and Release of γ-Aminobutyric Acid (GABA) by the Retina

  • M. J. Neal
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB)


The vertebrate retina originates embryologically as an outgrowth of the forebrain. Only about 15% of the tissue is specialized for photoreception and the remainder is representative of CNS grey matter. The retina possesses several experimental advantages for neurochemical and neuropharmacological studies. In particular, it can be isolated in vitro, intact, without any preliminary slicing or chopping procedures. In addition, it can be stimulated physiologically with flashes of light and the response of the tissue can be monitored by recording the electroretinogram. The organization of the retina is relatively well understood and its well defined layered structure facilitates the correlation of neurochemical and physiological findings with anatomical structure.


Intravitreal Injection Horizontal Cell Gaba Uptake Mammalian Retina Rabbit Retina 


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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1976

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. J. Neal
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PharmacologyThe School of PharmacyLondonUK

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