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Effect of Maternal Dietary Protein on Anthropometric and Behavioral Development of the Offspring

  • Bacon F. Chow
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 49)

Abstract

Anthropology is a science that treats of the growth of human beings, among other topics. Growth of human beings deals with not only physical measurements such as height, weight, head circumference, fatfold thickness, fat content, etc., but should include weights and functions of organs. Above all, the metabolism of the whole human being should be included. In our laboratory, we have recognized since 1942 that individuals with equivalent height and weight may have organs of different size, function and metabolism. Further, we have demonstrated that the composition of tissues, such as blood and organs, can be altered through the diet, and, more recently, we have demonstrated that the metabolic function of animals and humans can be altered in utero, particularly through the diet of the mother. With this in mind, we present herewith the three parts of our paper.

Keywords

Birth Weight Basal Diet Nitrogen Balance Maternal Diet Test Diet 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1974

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bacon F. Chow
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Biochemical and Biophysical Sciences, School of Hygiene and Public HealthThe Johns Hopkins UniversityBaltimoreUSA

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