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Utilization and Tolerance of Intravenous Fat Emulsions

  • Robert P. Geyer
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 46)

Abstract

Emulsions of fat have been the subject of much research in the field of parenteral nutrition because they offer a concentrated source of calories in a moderate volume without the complications of hypertonic solutions. It is generally accepted that a suitable emulsion would be highly desirable in those instances where caloric requirements are high and excessive amounts of fluid must be avoided. Much of the effort in this area during the past three or four decades has been devoted to proving intravenously administered fat is utilized, is efficacious, and is devoid of serious reactions when properly formulated (Geyer, 1960; Wretlind, 1972; Geyer, 1970). This presentation is concerned with the utilization and tolerance of parenteral fat emulsions.

Keywords

Parenteral Nutrition None None Unesterified Fatty Acid Choline Phosphate Parenteral Amino Acid 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1974

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert P. Geyer
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of NutritionHarvard School of Public HealthBostonUSA

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