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The Regulation of Energy Intake by Developing and Adult Animals

  • R. A. McCance
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 46)

Abstract

I always advise my male acquaintances that if they want to brag about the size of their first born at birth, they should marry a large woman and feed her well during pregnancy, but if they want him to double his birth weight quickly, they should arrange to have him born prematurely.

Keywords

Energy Intake Ventromedial Hypothalamic Nucleus Large Woman Great Energy Intake Baby Show 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1974

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. A. McCance
    • 1
  1. 1.Sidney Sussex CollegeCambridgeEngland

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