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Induction of C-Type Particles in Mammalian Cancer Cells

  • Y. Becker
  • Genia Balabanova
  • Eynat Weinberg
  • M. Kotler
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 44)

Abstract

Temin postulated (1,2) that the viral DNA synthesized by the oncorna virion-associated reverse transcriptase (3,4) integrates into the host cell DNA as an essential step in the cellular transformation process. The studies of Hill and Hillova, who demonstrated that permissive cells were transformed by purified DNA molecules from transformed cells (5), confirmed Temin’s hypothesis. Thus, the oncorna virus-transformed cell contains viral DNA sequences in the cellular genome. The mechanism which leads to the integration of the viral DNA molecules into the cellular DNA is not yet known. Also, the cellular mechanisms which control the expression of the viral DNA are not yet understood. In permissive cells, transformation is accompanied by virus production, while in nonpermissive cells transformation occurs but without virus production. These findings suggest that in nonpermissive cells, the transcription of the viral DNA is controlled by the host cell process. Although the viral DNA is repressed in the nonpermissive cells, it was demonstrated (6) that virus synthesis could be induced by fusion of transformed cells with permissive cells. Treatment with 5-bromodeoxyuridine (BUdR) also induced virus replication (7), similar to the effect of arginine deprivation on nonpermissive cells (8). Although the mechanism of virus induction is not understood, the induction of virus replication was used to study the presence of oncorna viruses in cancer cells.

Keywords

Sucrose Gradient Cytosine Arabinoside Rous Sarcoma Virus Virus Release Permissive Cell 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1974

Authors and Affiliations

  • Y. Becker
    • 1
  • Genia Balabanova
    • 1
  • Eynat Weinberg
    • 1
  • M. Kotler
    • 1
  1. 1.Laboratory for Molecular VirologyHebrew University-Hadassah Medical SchoolJerusalemIsrael

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