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Tryptophan Pyrrolase in Ethanol Administration and Withdrawal

  • A. A.-B. Badawy
  • M. Evans
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 35)

Abstract

The inverse relation between liver tryptophan pyrrolase activity and brain 5-hydroxytryptamine (serotonin or 5-HT) concentration, and evidence of the importance of serotonin in disorders of affect are well documented (1). Mood changes are common in acute and chronic ethanol intoxication, and affective disorders are frequent clinical features in chronic alcoholism and withdrawal. Serotonin has also been implicated in the action of drugs of dependence including hallucinogens (2) and Davis and Walsh (3) have described a key role to it in their biochemical theory of alcoholism. The synthesis of serotonin in the brain depends on the availability of circulating tryptophan which is largely removed by the liver through the kynurenine pathway. This pathway is governed by the first and rate-limiting enzyme tryptophan pyrrolase. Thus it follows that the activity of this enzyme is of prime interest in studies of alcohol drinking, alcoholism, alcohol withdrawal and the initiating and accompanying alterations of mood in these conditions.

Keywords

Alcohol Withdrawal Chronic Ethanol Ethanol Treatment Kynurenine Pathway Ethanol Administration 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1973

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. A.-B. Badawy
    • 1
  • M. Evans
    • 1
  1. 1.Addiction UnitWhitchurch HospitalCardiffUK

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