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Affective Changes During 6 Days of Experimental Alcoholization and Subsequent Withdrawal

  • Meena Nagarajan
  • M. M. Gross
  • B. Kissin
  • Suzanne Best
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 35)

Abstract

Experimental studies of affective changes associated with prolonged heavy alcoholization and withdrawal are of considerable importance. They offer the possibility of delineating critical motivational factors involved in heavy drinking (approximately one quart or more of hard spirits/day). Drinking at such high levels probably occurs intermittently as part of the clinical course of many alcoholics and may be of particular importance in inducing withdrawal at high levels of severity.

Keywords

Heavy Drinking Withdrawal Period Affective Change Spontaneous Drinking Drinking Period 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1973

Authors and Affiliations

  • Meena Nagarajan
    • 1
  • M. M. Gross
    • 1
  • B. Kissin
    • 1
  • Suzanne Best
    • 1
  1. 1.Div. of Alcoholism & Drug Dependence, Dept. of PsychiatryDownstate Medical CenterBrooklynUSA

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