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Environmental Temperature and the Metabolic Response to Injury — Plasma Proteins

  • A. Fleck
  • F. C. Ballantyne
  • W. J. Tilstone
  • D. P. Cuthbertson
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 33)

Abstract

Few studies of the now well-known changes in plasma proteins after injury take into account the environmental temperature of the subject; the work of Davies, Liljedahl & Birke (l969) on patients who had sustained burns is one exception. Changes in the plasma protein fractions after injury have been reviewed and summarised by Owen (l967):— a1-, and a2-globulin increass and there is a transient decrease in plasma albumin concentration. With the introduction of quantitative immunodiffusion techniques it was found that numerous proteins change in a variety of ways after trauma. The group known as ‘acute phase reactants’ which include fibrinogen, C-reactive protein,a1 acid glycoprotein, haptoglobin, and ceruloplasmin, all show an increased plasma concentration after injury (Werner & Cohnen, 1969). Each protein has a characteristic response which is not related to the nature of the trauma (Koj, 1970). In contrast, the plasma concentration of albumin, thyroxine-binding pre-albumin and transferrin decreases after injury (Gordon, 1970).

Keywords

Environmental Temperature Acute Phase Reactant Plasma Albumin Increase Plasma Concentration Acid Glycoprotein 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1973

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. Fleck
    • 1
  • F. C. Ballantyne
    • 1
  • W. J. Tilstone
    • 1
  • D. P. Cuthbertson
    • 1
  1. 1.Biochemistry DepartmentGlasgow Royal InfirmaryScotland

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