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Microcirculation and Hypoxia

  • D. W. Lübbers
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 33)

Abstract

Microcirculation brings about the convective transport of O2 through the capillary network of the tissue. From the capillaries into the tissue O2 is transported mainly by diffusion. Within the tissue O2 reacts with cytochrome oxidase which is part of the respiratory chain. The respiratory chain is situated in the mitochondria. Consuming O2 and substrate H2, it produces ATP-energy. Aerobically 1 mol glucose will produce 2 + 36 = 38mol ATP, but anaerobically only 2 mol ATP. The energy production in warm-blooded animals depends largely on aerobic energy production. Therefore, in most organs a lack of O2 produces quickly an energy deficiency.

Keywords

Cytochrome Oxidase Brain Cortex Capillary Network Convective Transport Countercurrent System 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1973

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. W. Lübbers
    • 1
  1. 1.Max-Planck-Institut für ArbeitsphysiologieDortmundWest Germany

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