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Patterns of Medication in Early Pregnancy: A Preliminary Report from the Jerusalem Perinatal Study

  • Susan Harlap
  • A. Michael Davies
  • Michael Haber
  • Rachel Prywes
  • Hava Rossman
  • Naomi Samueloff
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 27)

Abstract

Since the thalidomide disaster, increasing attention has been focused on drugs as possible teratogens. Many commonly used drugs are teratogenic in animals but their role in the genesis of human malformations, within the usual range of dosage, remains in doubt (1). Human studies are beset with methodological difficulties, including the validity of retrospective investigation, the problems of selected populations and the difficulties of identifying malformations among early pregnancy losses (2,3). Furthermore, little is known of patterns of medication on large populations, or of the effect of demographic, cultural and health variables on the use of commonly prescribed drugs.

Keywords

Early Pregnancy Congenital Malformation Maternal Education Vaginal Discharge Expectant Mother 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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    BRENT, R.L. Implication of experimental teratogenesis, in clarkfrazer, F. and McKusick, V.A. (Eds.) Congenital Malformations, Proceedings of the Third International Conference. The Hague, Excerpta Medica, Amsterdam (1970).Google Scholar
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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1972

Authors and Affiliations

  • Susan Harlap
    • 1
  • A. Michael Davies
    • 1
  • Michael Haber
    • 1
  • Rachel Prywes
    • 1
  • Hava Rossman
    • 1
  • Naomi Samueloff
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Medical EcologyThe Hebrew University-Hadassah Medical SchoolJerusalemIsrael

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