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Anomalous Fetal and Neonatal Bone Development Induced by Administration of Cortisone and Vitamin D2 to Pregnant Rats

  • A. Ornoy
  • A. Horowitz
  • T. Kaspi
  • Y. Michaeli
  • L. Nebel
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 27)

Abstract

Several teratogenic agents may cause skeletal anomalies. Since the pioneering studies of Warkany and Nelson, who described a pattern of skeletal anomalies in rat fetuses following nutritional deficiency in the pregnant mother (1,2), teratogens such as alkylating agents have been found also to cause skeletal anomalies in the offspring (3,4). However, in most cases the anomalies were not in the whole skeleton, and normal as well as abnormal bones could be found concomitantly. In our experiments we endeavored to explore whether, by administration of substances such as vitamin D and cortisone to pregnant mothers, the fetal skeleton could be affected as a whole. These substances are already known to have an effect on the skeletal system (5,6).

Keywords

Osteogenesis Imperfecta Pregnant Mother Skeletal Anomaly Cortisone Acetate Bone Marrow Cavity 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1972

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. Ornoy
    • 1
    • 2
  • A. Horowitz
    • 1
    • 2
  • T. Kaspi
    • 1
    • 2
  • Y. Michaeli
    • 1
    • 2
  • L. Nebel
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Embyology and Teratology and the Department of PathologyTel-Aviv University Medical SchoolTel-HashomerIsrael
  2. 2.Department of AnatomyHebrew University Medical SchoolJerusalemIsrael

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