Advertisement

Recent Studies on the Enzymes that Synthesize Brain Gangliosides

  • J. A. Dain
  • J. L. Di Cesare
  • M. C. M. Yip
  • H. Weicker
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 25)

Abstract

The enzymic synthesis of brain gangliosides proceeds via a stepwise addition of monosaccharide units from sugar nucleotides to glycosphingolipid acceptors. Several possible pathways for ganglioside biosynthesis have been proposed (s. Scheme) utilizing this mechanism. Preliminary reports by Steigerwald et al. (1) and Kaufman et al. (2) have described a particulate embryonic chick brain preparation which would catalize the synthesis of gangliosides via the sequence of reactions 2, 3, and 4. The demonstrations in brain of reaction 3 in the frog (3) and rat (4, 5), reaction 4 in the frog (3, 6, 7) and rat (5, 8, 9), and reaction 2 in frog (Table I) suggests that this pathway is probably universal in vertebrates.

Keywords

Competition Study Monosaccharide Unit Brain Ganglioside Rhode Island 02881 Major Gangl Iosides 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. (1).
    Steigerwald, J. C., Kaufman, B., Basu, S. and Roseman, S., Fed. Proc. 25: 587 (1966).Google Scholar
  2. (2).
    Kaufman, B., Basu, S. and Roseman, S., in Aronson, S. M. and Volk, B. W., Proc. 3rd Intern. Symp. Cerebral Sphingolipidoses, Pergamon Press, New York, p. 193 (1966).Google Scholar
  3. (3).
    Dain, J. A., Mark, M., Yip, M. C. M., Yiamouyiannis, J. and Y-Cha, 154th Am. Chem. Soc. Meeting, Chicago, 69 c (1967).Google Scholar
  4. (4).
    Di Cesare, J. L. and Dain, J. A., Biochim. Biophys. Acta 231: 385 (1971).Google Scholar
  5. (5).
    Di Cesare, J. L. and Dain, J. A., J. Neurochem., in press, (1972).Google Scholar
  6. (6).
    Yiamouyiannis, J. A. and Dain, J. A., Lipids 3: 378 (1968).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. (7).
    Yip, M. C.M. and Dain, J. A., Biochem. J. 118: 247 (1970).Google Scholar
  8. (8).
    Hildebrand, J., Stoffyn, P. and Hauser, G., J. Neurochem. 17: 403 (1970).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. (9).
    Yip, G. B. and Dain, J. A., Biochim. Biophys. Acta 206: 252 (1970).Google Scholar
  10. (10).
    Dain, J. A. and Yip, M. C. M., Metabolismo 5: 129(1969).Google Scholar
  11. (11).
    Yip, M. C. M., Studies on the Biosynthesis of Gangliosides in Rana Pipiens, Ph. D. Thesis, University of Rhode Island (1968).Google Scholar
  12. (12).
    Di Cesare, J. L. and Dain, J. A., unpublished data.Google Scholar
  13. (13).
    Folch, J., Lees, M. and Sloane-Stanley, G.H., J. Biol. Chem. 226: 497 (1957).Google Scholar
  14. (14).
    Kanfer, J. N. and Brady, R. O., in Aronson, S. M. and Volk, B. W., Proc. 3rd Intern. Symp. Cerebral Sphingolipidoses, Pergamon Press, New York, p. 187(1968).Google Scholar
  15. (15).
    Yip, M. C.M. and Dain, J. A., Lipids 4: 270 (1969).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. (16).
    Handa, I.S. and Burton, R. M., Lipids 4: 589 (1969).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. (17).
    Arce, A., Maccioni, H. F. and Capputto, R., Arch. Biochem. Biophys. 116: 52 (1966).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. (18).
    Lapetina, E.G., Soto, E. F. and De Robertis, E., Biochim. Biophys. Acta 135: 33 (1967).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. (19).
    Svennerholm, L., J. Lipid Res. 5: 145 (1964).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1972

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. A. Dain
    • 1
  • J. L. Di Cesare
    • 1
  • M. C. M. Yip
    • 1
  • H. Weicker
    • 2
  1. 1.Dept. of BiochemistryUniversity of Rhode IslandKingstonUSA
  2. 2.S. J. Thannhauser-Abteilung für StoffwechseluntersuchungenMedizinische-Univ-PoliklinikHeidelbergGermany

Personalised recommendations