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Seed Meristems as Radiobiological Test Systems

  • C. F. Konzak
  • E. A. Favret
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 18)

Abstract

Seeds or the seedling plants grown from seeds have been used as biological test material from the beginning of radiobiology28. Barley seeds in particular have figured in important scientific advances. Stadler (1928), for example, used barley and later maize for his experiments on the artificial mutation of the gene in plants. It is also of some significance that the same variety of barley, Himalaya (C. I. 620), treated by Stadler is even more widely used today as an international radiobiological research standard. Himalaya barley is also extensively used for physiological and biochemical studies and in chemical mutagenesis research9, 13,15,16,27.

Keywords

Leaf Blade Neutron Irradiation Leaf Sheath Barley Seed Seedling Height 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1972

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. F. Konzak
    • 1
  • E. A. Favret
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
  1. 1.Department of Agronomy & Soils and Program in GeneticsWashington State UniversityPullmanUSA
  2. 2.Department of Agronomy and Soils and Program in GeneticsWashington State UniversityArgentina
  3. 3.Institute of Plant BreedingInstituto Nacional de Tecnologia AgropecuariaCastelarArgentina
  4. 4.Program in GeneticsWashington State UniversityPullmanUSA

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