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Shoot Dry Weight of the Soybean Seedling Following Gamma Irradiation: Effects of Exposure, Exposure Rate, and Split Exposure

  • M. J. Constantin
  • D. D. Killion
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 18)

Abstract

The exposure of organisms to ionizing radiation induces a series of varied effects that collectively can lead to growth reduction and/or lethality. A number of biological, environmental, and radiological factors, however, influence the extent of damage induced by an exposure to ionizing radiation.15 Results of research with a number of biological test systems show that more damage is induced per unit of radiation delivered at relatively high rates than at low rates, i.e., there is an exposure-rate effect.5 The split-exposure technique is commonly used to study exposure-rate effects in organisms because the phenomenon is generally interpreted on the basis of repair of induced damage.2,5,8,11

Keywords

Shoot Apical Meristem Exposure Rate Initial Exposure Brookhaven National Laboratory Soybean Seedling 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1972

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. J. Constantin
    • 1
  • D. D. Killion
    • 1
  1. 1.Agricultural Research LaboratoryUniversity of TennesseeOak RidgeUSA

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