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Leucocidin, DFP, The Leucocyte Potassium Pump and the Inhibition of Chemotaxis

  • A. M. Woodin
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 15)

Abstract

It is a reasonable hypothesis that phagocytosis and motility in the polymorphonuclear leucocyte* depend on special properties of the cell membrane that are absent from membranes of tissue cells. Any clue to the nature of these characteristics may be of value in identifying the mechanism of phagocytosis and motility. I describe here some unique properties of the leucocyte surface that have been revealed by studying the cytotoxic action of leucocidin (1, 2). The evidence that the mode of action of leucocidin is relevant to the mechanism of phagocytosis and motility is circumstantial, depending on the modification of all three phenomena by organophosphorus compounds. Nevertheless, I hope the new data made available will enable a new approach to be made to the mechanism of chemotaxis and phagocytosis.

Keywords

Organophosphorus Compound Polymorphonuclear Leucocyte Sodium Iodide Acetyl Phosphate Physiological Ionic Strength 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1971

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. M. Woodin
    • 1
  1. 1.Strangeways Research LaboratoryWort’s CausewayCambridgeUK

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