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The Depressive Effects of Immunoglobulin Containing Fractions of Serum upon Erythrophagocytosis

  • J. A. Habeshaw
  • A. E. Stuart
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 15)

Abstract

One of the important functions of the macrophage system appears to be the detection and phagocytosis of foreign material. In vivo, the phagocytic reaction to foreign material is modified by the presence of chemotactic and opsonic materials contained in the body fluids. Studies of phagocytosis in vitro, in the presence of serum, are likely also to reflect merely the activity of the opsonic substances contained within the environment, and not the intrinsic capacity of the macrophage to react with foreign material.

Keywords

Depressive Effect Mouse Serum Mouse Macrophage Phagocytic Index Serum Fraction 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1971

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. A. Habeshaw
    • 1
  • A. E. Stuart
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PathologyUniversity of EdinburghUK

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