Cytochemistry of Lysosomes of the Liver RES during Malaria Infection at the Electronmicroscopic Level

  • P. H. K. Jap
  • C. Jerusalem
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 15)


Malarial infection (Plasmodium berghei) in mice can be regarded as a model for studying drastic RES changes. We used the liver as one of the organs which undergoes very severe changes, due both to the parasitic agent and to its toxin. These structural alterations are the result of the effect of the toxicity combined vith the administered infection dose (1).


Acid Phosphatase Esterase Activity Acid Phosphatase Activity Malarial Infection PLasmodium Berghei 


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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1971

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. H. K. Jap
    • 1
  • C. Jerusalem
    • 1
  1. 1.Laboratory of Cyto-HistologyUniversity of NijmegenThe Netherlands

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