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Cancer Chemotherapy and Blood Kininogen Content

  • P. Periti
  • F. Gasparri
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 8)

Abstract

We know that various substances and drugs can influence blood kininogen level either by direct or by indirect action on kininogenase (1,2,3). The immediate consequence of this action is the release of kinins and this release may be so high as to influence the homeostasis of blood pressure and circulation until circulatory shock occurs (4,5).

Keywords

Autologous Bone Marrow Nitrogen Mustard Circulatory Shock Uterine Neoplasm Peripheral Blood Leucocyte 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1970

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. Periti
    • 1
  • F. Gasparri
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Pharmacology and Institute of Clinical Obstetrics and GynecologyUniversity of FlorenceFlorenceItaly

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