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Effect of Anti-Lymphocyte Serum on Mouse Lymphoid Tissues in Vivo and in Vitro

  • Giuseppe Tridente
  • Dirk W. van Bekkum
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 5)

Abstract

Heterologous antilymphocyte serum (ALS) and antilymphocyte globulin (ALG) are potent immunosuppressive agents, particularly in cell-mediated immunity and primary immune responses [1-3]. Their mode of action has been disputed, however, as well as the morphological changes seen in lymphoid tissues following treatment. Lymphocyte destruction and/or functional inactivation through a “blindfolding” mechanism or a “sterile” activation have been alternatively suggested as some of the possible mechanisms of action [1, 4-6]. These immunosuppressive agents have also shown specific effects on lymphocytesin vitro — i.e., cytotoxicity, leukoagglutination, mitogenic and blastogenic activity [7-10] — which have been extensively investigated both to clarify the mode of action of antilymphocyte sera and to develop in vitro methods to estimate their immunosuppressive effect in vivo [11-13]. Following these lines of research we became interested in possible modifications of some functions of lymphoid cells in vitro after ALS treatment.

Keywords

Normal Rabbit Serum Paracortical Area Antilymphocyte Serum Spleen Culture Pyroninophilic Cell 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press 1969

Authors and Affiliations

  • Giuseppe Tridente
    • 1
  • Dirk W. van Bekkum
    • 1
  1. 1.Radiobiological Institute TNORijswijkThe Netherlands

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