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Histologic Localization of Hemolysin-Containing Cells

  • F. W. Fitch
  • R. Stejskal
  • D. A. Rowley
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 5)

Abstract

The complexity of the cellular events that take place during antibody formation is emphasized by several recent studies. Induction of the antibody response requires interaction between several different types of cells that are derived from or have developed under the influence of different tissues [1, 2, 3, 4]. Once antibody production begins, several different molecular types of immunoglobulins may be formed. Phylogenetic, ontogenetic, and experimental data suggest that cells forming IgM and IgG antibody represent two distinct stages in the same cell lineage, if not two distinct cell lines [5, 6, 7]. Antibody-releasing cells arising during the immune response can be enumerated by the technique of localized hemolysis in gel [8, 9]. This method, however, provides no information concerning the histologic relationships of such cells within lymphoid tissues. The present studies were undertaken to determine the histologic location of antibody-containing cells in an attempt to determine sites of cellular interactions.

Keywords

Cryostat Section Lymphoid Follicle Sheep Erythrocyte Spleen Cell Suspension Histologic Location 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press 1969

Authors and Affiliations

  • F. W. Fitch
    • 1
  • R. Stejskal
    • 1
  • D. A. Rowley
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PathologyUniversity of Chicago, The Argonne Cancer Research HospitalChicagoUSA

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