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Studies on the Kinetics and Radiation Sensitivity of Dendritic Macrophages

  • R. L. Hunter
  • R. W. Wissler
  • F. W. Fitch
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 5)

Abstract

The dendritic macrophages located in the lymphoid follicles of the rat spleen are fundamentally different from other types of macrophages. In the present experiments, we have studied the process by which material is taken into dendritic macrophages, the effects of X-radiation on this process, and the relationship between the amount of antigen retained by the dendritic macrophages and the peak titer of antibody produced. These experiments support the growing body of evidence that the small fraction of antigen retained by the dendritic macrophages plays an important part in the stimulation and/or maintenance of IgG antibody production.

Keywords

Marginal Zone Lymphoid Follicle Radiation Sensitivity Marginal Sinus Peak Titer 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press 1969

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. L. Hunter
    • 1
  • R. W. Wissler
    • 2
  • F. W. Fitch
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of PathologyUniversity of ChicagoChicagoUSA
  2. 2.The Argonne Cancer Research HospitalChicagoUSA
  3. 3.The National Institutes of HealthBethesdaUSA

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