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Peptides and the Central Nervous System

  • Arthur J. PrangeJr.
  • Charles B. Nemeroff
  • Morris A. Lipton
  • George R. Breese
  • Ian C. Wilson

Abstract

The brain is known to contain many peptides of diverse molecular weight and complexity. The larger ones contribute to the structure and to the enzymatic machinery essential for the metabolism of this complex organ. Smaller ones are hormones and some may be involved in the formation of long-term memory. Still others may arise as a consequence of generalized experiences such as sleep. Because the number of possible amino acid combinations is immense, it is likely that many more peptides will be discovered and that these will be found to have functions unique to the brain.

Keywords

Thyrotropin Release Hormone Median Eminence Alcohol Withdrawal Syndrome Anterior Pituitary Hormone Subfornical Organ 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1978

Authors and Affiliations

  • Arthur J. PrangeJr.
    • 1
  • Charles B. Nemeroff
    • 1
  • Morris A. Lipton
    • 1
  • George R. Breese
    • 1
  • Ian C. Wilson
    • 2
  1. 1.Departments of Psychiatry and Pharmacology and the Neurobiology Program, Biological Sciences Research CenterUniversity of North Carolina School of MedicineChapel HillUSA
  2. 2.Division of ResearchThe North Carolina Department of Mental HealthRaleighUSA

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