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Opiates: Human Psychopharmacology

  • Peter A. Mansky
Part of the Handbook of Psychopharmacology book series (HBKPS)

Abstract

Although the pharmacology of opiates will be comprehensively reviewed in this chapter, a major emphasis and depth of the discussion will concern the psychopharmacological effects of opiates. Under this rubric the subjectively perceived effects, objective behavioral observations, and correlative influence of physiological function will be emphasized. Underlying mechanisms of action will be discussed if applicable. The reader, however, is referred to Chapter 2 for a thorough discussion of chemical structure-activity relationships. Reference will be made to this area when relevant to the discussion.

Keywords

Abstinence Syndrome Opiate Dependency Euphoric Effect Opiate Agonist Addiction Research Center Inventory 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1978

Authors and Affiliations

  • Peter A. Mansky
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Psychiatry, Albert B. Chandler Medical CenterUniversity of KentuckyLexingtonUSA

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