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Drug Self-Administration: An Analysis of the Reinforcing Effects of Drugs

  • Roy Pickens
  • Richard A. Meisch
  • Travis Thompson
Part of the Handbook of Psychopharmacology book series (HBKPS)

Abstract

The behavioral effects of drugs were once viewed as being limited to the changes in responding that occurred directly following drug administration. Drug effects were believed to be relatively stereotyped and to consist of little more than temporary alterations of the biological mechanisms controlling ongoing responding. However, recent research has forced an expansion of this view. At present, behavioral drug actions can be viewed as existing on a continuum. On one extreme are effects that are relatively independent of environmental influences or the temporal relation between drug administration and responding (e.g., effects of d-amphetamine on locomotor activity). On the other end of the continuum are drug actions that are intimately dependent on their functional relation to environmental events and/or their temporal relation to responding (e.g., effects of d-amphetamine on high-rate versus low-rate schedule-controlled responding).

Keywords

Rhesus Monkey Drug Intake Injection Dose Conditioned Reinforcer Abstinence Period 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1978

Authors and Affiliations

  • Roy Pickens
    • 1
  • Richard A. Meisch
    • 1
  • Travis Thompson
    • 1
  1. 1.University of MinnesotaMinneapolisUSA

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